This information was produced by the staff of the Belin-Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development (B-BC) at the University of Iowa (belinblank.org). The resources and information listed here are for informational purposes; there is no direct or implied endorsement by the B-BC. Services provided by the B-BC include programs for academically talented K-12 and college students, professional development for teachers, the Assessment and Counseling Clinic, the Acceleration Institute (accelerationinstitute.org), and graduate programs and research in gifted education.

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State Policies in Hawaii  

Hawaii does not have a state policy on acceleration. Local education agencies (LEAs) determine whether and to what extent acceleration is permitted.

Grade-based Acceleration

Early entrance to kindergarten

No state policy; up to LEA to determine.

Children who are 5 years old by July 31 must attend kindergarten, according to Hawaii Revised Statute ยง302A-411.

Early entrance to 1st gradeIf you know where to find this information, please e-mail us.
Whole-grade accelerationThe Hawaii Revised Statutes Chapter 51 provides for education of gifted and talented students through programs that are flexible and allow students to progress at their own rate and in accordance with their interests. The statute also encourages providing time for these students to be with like-ability peers. Though acceleration is not directly stated in the provision, it seems that it would be acceptable according to these components.
Early high school graduationHawaii offers two types of diplomas for high school graduates. Students can earn the standard diploma by completing the standard requirements, or they can work toward the Board of Education (BOE) Recognition Diploma with honors if they meet the course and credit requirements and maintain a GPA of 3.0 or higher. The graduation requirements for the Class of 2014 & 2015 differ slightly from those for the Class of 2016 and beyond
Early entrance to collegeSeveral Hawaii colleges and universities offer early admission programs that are intended to supplement the student's high school curriculum. Perhaps as a result, the attention paid to early entrance to college is minimal. However, students can access the benefits of challenging college coursework through dual/concurrent enrollment, more information on which can be found in the dual/concurrent enrollment section on this page.

Content-based Acceleration

Dual or concurrent enrollment in community college, college, or universityState policy specifically permits dual enrollment beginning in grade 10. State policy specifically allows students to receive high school credit for college courses. Hawaii's Running Start program allows high school students to earn high school and college credit simultaneously. The University of West Oahu participates in the Running Start program, but also offers an Early Admission Program that is intended to supplement a student's high school curriculum.
Middle school students permitted dual or concurrent enrollment in high school

No state policy; up to LEA to determine.
Advanced Placement®If you know where to find this information, please e-mail us.
Talent SearchThe Hawaii Department of Education encourages students in grades 2-8 who meet application criteria to apply to the Johns Hopkins University Center for Talented Youth Talent Search.
Credit by examination/proficiency-based promotion

No state policy; up to LEA to determine whether proficiency-based promotion is permitted.
Other forms of content-based acceleration

Typically left to LEAs to determine. If you know of state-level code, please e-mail us.

Additional Information

Hawaii Gifted and Talented Program
Hawaii Department of Education
Hawaii Gifted Association

The information presented on this page was compiled from a variety of resources, including the State of the States in Gifted Education 2012-2013 (a report by the Council of State Directors of Programs for the Gifted and the National Association for Gifted Children), Websites, professional literature, and personal communication. The Acceleration Institute has not verified the accuracy of this information and does not warrant its accuracy or fitness of use for any purpose. Users should verify information prior to taking any action. Furthermore, the appearance of selected programs and/or resources does not imply an endorsement or affiliation. Programs and resources are highlighted for informational purposes only.